LAS majors in demand

Earning a degree in the liberal arts and sciences will allow you to develop the skills employers demand. It's the key to a satisfying, highly flexible future. Learn more about job possibilities and placement rates for LAS majors.

"I personally think there's going to be a greater demand in 10 years for liberal arts majors than there were for programming majors and maybe even engineering, because when the data is all being spit out for you, options are being spit out for you, you need a different perspective in order to have a different view of the data. And so having someone who is more of a freer thinker." —Mark Cuban: Liberal arts is the future, Business Insider
"Throughout the major U.S. tech hubs, whether Silicon Valley or Seattle, Boston or Austin, Tex., software companies are discovering that liberal arts thinking makes them stronger. ... The war for talent has moved to nontechnical jobs, particularly sales and marketing. The more that audacious coders dream of changing the world, the more they need to fill their companies with social alchemists who can connect with customers--and make progress seem pleasant." —That 'useless' liberal arts degree has become tech's hottest ticket, Forbes
"Students are clamoring for degrees that will help them secure jobs in a shifting economy, but to succeed in the long term, they’ll require an education that allows them to grow, adapt, and contribute as citizens—and to build successful careers." —Why America's business majors are in desperate need of a liberal-arts education, The Atlantic
"Liberal arts majors may start off slower than others when it comes to the postgraduate career path, but they close much of the salary and unemployment gap over time, a new report shows. By their mid-50s, liberal arts majors with an advanced or undergraduate degree are on average making more money those who studied in professional and pre-professional fields, and are employed at similar rates." —Liberal arts grads win long-term, Inside Higher Ed
"A liberal arts education has its roots, etymologically and otherwise, in the requirements of liberty: what it takes to be a self-governing citizen rather than a slave. To be a citizen of a country like the United States you should be literate in the humanities as well as the sciences, in the arts as well as accounting. Illiteracy is risky. Willful illiteracy is civic malpractice." —Study liberal arts — and gain power, CNN.com
"People trained in the humanities who study Shakespeare’s poetry, or Cezanne’s paintings, say, have learned to play with big concepts, and to apply new ways of thinking to difficult problems that can’t be analyzed in conventional ways." —Want innovative thinking? Hire from the humanities, Harvard Business Review